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Russia and Japan extend Year of interregional and sister city exchanges

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Russia and Japan extend Year of interregional and sister city exchanges


22.11.2021

Photo credit: the Ministry of Defense of the Russian Federation / commons.wikimedia.org (CC BY 4.0)

It has decided to extend the Year of Russian-Japanese interregional and twin-city exchanges for a year, TASS reports. This issue was discussed at a meeting of the subcommittee of the intergovernmental commission on trade and economic issues on Monday, November 22.
 
The Year of Interregional Exchanges started in January. Over the past period, Tokyo has organized nearly 150 projects. The majority of them took place online. 

The authorities of both countries consider exchange programs to be very important. In particular, during the Cross Year of Japan and Russia, more than 600 events were held in Russia, bringing together more than 1,5 million people. Almost 400,000 people joined the events that took place in 2020 despite the pandemic.

The decision to hold the Year of Russian-Japanese interregional and twin city exchanges was made after the meeting of the heads of the two countries, Vladimir Putin and Shinzo Abe, in the summer of 2019 in Osaka. 

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