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What is a Russkiy Mir Cabinet?

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Russkiy Mir Cabinet


The Foundation’s Russkiy Mir Cabinet program is aimed at creating conditions conducive to the study of Russian language as well as increasing knowledge and understanding of Russian culture and the realities of contemporary Russia.

 

Objectives of the Russkiy Mir Cabinet Program:

  • Promotion of Russian culture and Russian language as a global language;

  • Informational support for compatriots abroad as well as foreign citizens interested in Russia.

Russkiy Mir Cabinets are organized and adapted in accordance with the specific needs of the hosting organization, including specially selected collections of language learning textbooks and literature as well as informational materials and audio-visual presentations about modern Russia, its culture and history. The Cabinets are organized and designed to fit the configuration of the space allocated by the hosting organization. Such Cabinets have been organized in various configurations at schools, libraries, universities, cultural centers, kindergartens, etc.

How the Program Works


The Foundation supports the creation of Russkiy Mir Cabinets via the provision of a contract-based donation to the hosting organization. This process begins with an official request form the potential host organization to the Foundation, indicating the materials requested for the formation of the Russkiy Mir Cabinet. If the Foundation approves the organization’s request, the two parties sign a donation agreement, which specifies in detail the materials to be provided by the Foundation free of charge. In turn, the host organization is obliged to use the materials for educational purposes with the aim of popularizing the Russian language and supporting intercultural dialog.

 

 More information about Russkiy Mir Cabinets is available on the Russian version of the Foundation’s Internet portal
 

 

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