Select language:

Russian scientists use neutron methods to investigate remains of Ivan the Terrible

 / Главная / Russkiy Mir Foundation / News / Russian scientists use neutron methods to investigate remains of Ivan the Terrible

Russian scientists use neutron methods to investigate remains of Ivan the Terrible


21.09.2021

Photo credit: Envoys from Ermak on the red porch in front of Ivan the Terrible. Stanislav Rostvorovsky, 1884 / ru.wikipedia.org (Public domain)

Russian physicists will analyze the elemental composition of the bones of the Russian Tsar Ivan the Terrible. The study will also touch upon the remains of his family members, including his father, Ivan III. The analysis will be carried out using neutron methods and modern equipment. Scientists believe that this will help to reveal new information regarding the life and death of the Russian tsar and other representatives of the royal family, TASS reports.

The Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR) announced that scientists would study the molecular composition of bones using infrared spectroscopy, as well as conduct a visual examination of the remains using modern optical equipment.

Previously, such studies provided new data on the fate and circumstances of the death of historical figures in Russia. An analysis of the hair of the first wife of Ivan the Terrible, Anastasia Romanovna, carried out four years ago, suggested that the woman was poisoned with mercury. Scientists also examined the bone of Ivan the Terrible's son and organic matter from the skull of the mother of Tsar, Elena Glinskaya.

Russkiy Mir

News by subject

Publications

Business and philanthropy walked in parallel in pre-revolutionary Russia. Big entrepreneurs were often also big philanthropists. They built hospitals, theaters, orphanages, and almshouses. Today the Museum of Entrepreneurs, Patrons, and Philanthropists in Moscow supports and promotes their legacy. Nadezhda Smirnova, museum director, told the Russkiy Mir about the high standard set by the philanthropists of pre-revolutionary Russia.
Few people are aware that Yoko Ono, John Lennon's wife who has spent most of her life in the United States, was brought up under the influence of her Russian aunt, Anna Bubnova. For over half a century, the estate where she grew up has been home to the museum of Alexander Pushkin. The poet had visited the Tver village of Bernovo more than once.