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Six Russian museums enter list of most visited in the world

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Six Russian museums enter list of most visited in the world


03.04.2020

Photo credit: Hermitage official website

The State Hermitage has taken eighth place in the world in attendance among the museums, according to the international rating of The Art Newspaper. Last year, the St. Petersburg museum received almost five million visitors. In total, six Russian museums were included in the top-100 list, TASS reports.

According to the organizers, the top-10 most visited museums in the world have stayed unchanged for a long time, and the Hermitage is always among the leaders. The first place was taken by the Louvre, the second went to the National Museum of China, and the third line is taken by the Vatican Museums.

Apart from the Hermitage, two other Russian museums made to top-20: the Kremlin Museum (17th place) and the Tretyakov Gallery (20th place). The Russian Museum, the Pushkin State Museum of Fine Arts and the Garage Museum are also in top-100.

All Russian museums improved their positions in the rating throughout the year. The ranking does not take into account museums that have parks in their structure, otherwise the Peterhof and Tsarskoye Selo museums-reserves could claim to be among the leaders.

The Art Newspaper also presented a list of the most visited exhibitions of the past year. The leader of the Russian list was the Schukin: Biography of the Collection exhibition, which operated in the Pushkin State Museum of Fine Arts in summer and autumn.

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