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Vandals damage monument to first cosmonaut in Zagreb

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Vandals damage monument to first cosmonaut in Zagreb


04.01.2017

Photo: © Embassy of the RF in Croatia The monument to Yury Gagarin has been damaged by unknown law violators, reports TASS. According to the staff members of the Embassy of the RF in Croatia, the vandals damaged the inscription made on the memorial plaque and singed the pedestal made of marble.

Chances are that the monument was brutally vandalized on the first days of 2017.

It is to be recalled that the opening ceremony of the monument to the first cosmonaut took place on 18 October. The idea to set up a monument to Yury Gagarin had been initiated by the Coordinating Council of Russian Compatriots living abroad. The monument was given as a gift to Zagreb by the Ethnographic Park Museum Ethnomir.

As it was reported by Russkiy Mir website, a monument to Alexander Pushkin had been unveiled in Zagreb in early summer 2016. His portrait sculpture made of bronze and having a height of about one meter fixed on the pedestal of two meter height was installed at the entrance to Bundek Park, the favorite recreation area of the local people. It became the first monument to the outstanding Russian writer installed in the country.

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