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Germany to pay extra pension to Jews who survived Leningrad siege

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Germany to pay extra pension to Jews who survived Leningrad siege


07.10.2021

Photo credit: unknown author / commons.wikimedia.org (Public domain)

The German authorities are going to pay an additional pension to Jews who survived the siege of Leningrad, TASS reports. It will amount to 375 euros. The corresponding agreement was reached during negotiations between the Jewish Claims Conference non-governmental organization and the German authorities.

The money will be allocated to Jews who have lived for at least three months in Leningrad during the siege. Jews, who spent at least three months from April 1, 1941 to August 31, 1944 in Romania or who were on the territory of occupied France can apply for a pension. 

Earlier, the Russian Foreign Ministry called on Germany to allocate pensions to the siege survivors of all nationalities. 

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