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Memory of Soviet war prisoners honored in Slovenia

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Memory of Soviet war prisoners honored in Slovenia


01.10.2021

Photo credit: LukeL / pixabay.com

Several expositions opened in Maribor in memory of Soviet prisoners of the Stalag XVIII-D concentration camp, which existed in Slovenia during World War II. The opening ceremony was attended by the President of Slovenia, Russian diplomats and historians, TASS reports.

The exposition dedicated to concentration camp prisoners was placed in a carriage, which took the prisoners of war to Stalag XVIII-D. It tell about the life of the Red Army soldiers and other prisoners in the camp.

Russian Ambassador to Slovenia Timur Eyvazov, the President of Slovenia Borut Pahor, the mayor of the city of Maribor Sasha Arsenovich, the director of the Victory Museum Alexander Shkolnik took part in the commemorative events.

More than 5,000 soldiers representing different republics of the USSR were brutally killed within the walls of the Slovenian camp. 

The head of the department for foreign economic and international relations of Moscow, Sergei Cheremin, stressed that the Moscow authorities will continue to support the activities of the International Research Center of World War II in Maribor.

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