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Best translators of Russian literature awarded Read Russia Prize

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Best translators of Russian literature awarded Read Russia Prize


23.12.2020

Photo credit: godliteratury.ru

The winners of the Read Russia Prize have become known, including translators of works by Russian writers into foreign languages, according to the website of the Year of Literature.

Due to the unfavorable epidemiological situation, the award ceremony was held online. It was broadcast live from the Gutenberg Hall of the Foreign Literature Library.

The prize is designed to encourage translators and promote translations of Russian literature abroad. The award is given for the best translation from Russian into a foreign language every two years.

The best were named in four nominations: "Classical Russian Literature", "Literature of the 20th century (works created before 1990)", "Contemporary Russian literature (works created after 1990)" and "Poetry".

The cash reward is $10,000.

Among those awarded were Ugur Bücke and Sabri Gürses for the translation into Turkish of the 22-volume collected works of Leo Tolstoy, and Claudia Dzonghetti for the translation into Italian of the stories of Ivan Bunin. Among the winners are also Jorge Ferrer for the translation into Spanish of Guzeli Yakhina's novel "Zuleikha Opens Her Eyes" and Lubinka Milincic for the translation into Serbian of Alexei Varlamov's novel "The Mental Wolf". Another laureate was the American Anthony Wood for the translation of Pushkin's poems.

By decision of the Grand Jury, which includes Russian language specialists from all over the world, the winners were selected from a short list. It included 38 translations of Russian literature from more than a dozen countries. Among them are texts by both contemporary authors and classics. A total of 176 applications from 30 countries were submitted for the prize.

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