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First-year foreign students will be able to come to Russian universities in September

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First-year foreign students will be able to come to Russian universities in September


14.09.2020

Photo credit: SPbPU

First-year foreigners who entered Russian universities this year will be able to come to Russia this month, TASS reports. According to the Minister of Higher Education and Science Valery Falkov, this applies to the citizens of those countries that will open their borders in September.

The head of the department promised that students would have the opportunity to enter Russia according to the developed scheme. He said that a special algorithm of actions was already ready. It involves local authorities, federal authorities and the management of universities. With its help, about 25,000 foreigners will come to Russia.

The algorithm is expected to be approved in the coming days.

Valery Falkov explained that the epidemiological situation in some regions was not easy. The arrival of many students from abroad may lead to an increase in the number of diseases.

Senior students will also be able to come to Russia, but a little later, the minister promised. He added that there is also the opposite problem: students who have already received their diplomas cannot leave Russia.

Over 100,000 foreign students from Russian universities cannot yet come to Russia to start or continue their studies due to the epidemiological situation in the countries of residence.

Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov said earlier that the issue would be resolved within a month. He noted that as part of the work on the permit, consultations were held with all relevant departments.

It is emphasized that students will enter Russia in groups, observing certain quantitative indicators, the process will take several weeks.

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