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Monument to Soviet pilots opened in Pyongyang

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Monument to Soviet pilots opened in Pyongyang


10.05.2019

Photo: facebook.com

The solemn opening ceremony of the memorial in honor of Soviet pilots took place in Pyongyang on May 9. In 1950–1953, they participated in the Korean War, the Russian Embassy in the DPRK reports on its Facebook page. The monument was erected at the cemetery in the Sadon area, which is the main burial site for Soviet soldiers. 

Russian Ambassador to DPRK Alexander Matsegora attended the ceremony. He recalled that the bombing of a coalition led by the United States killed more than 280,000 Korean civilians. Most of them were women, children and the elderly. Cities were destructed and the infrastructure was almost completely destroyed. 

The entry of the 64th Fighter Aviation Corps of Soviet air force helped to save hundreds of thousands of Korean people from death, the Ambassador stressed. Our warriors fought hand in hand with the Chinese and Korean fighters, they conducted 1,790 battles and shot down 1106 enemy aircraft. 22 pilots received the title of Hero of the Soviet Union, 315 pilots died for peace in Korea. 

The memorial was created and installed on the personal funds of the staff of Russian Embassy. Pyongyang’s stonecutters from Mansudae creative association made it. 

As Russkiy Mir reported, in late April, Pyongyang authorities worked on a monument in honor of Soviet soldiers who died in battles with the Japanese army during the liberation of Korea in the summer of 1945. Russian Embassy in DPRK expressed sincere thanks to Korean friends. Diplomats noted that they are very careful with monuments and war graves.

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