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Russian prisoners of war honoured in Frankfurt (Oder)

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Russian prisoners of war honoured in Frankfurt (Oder)


19.11.2018

patriotcenter.ru

The restored cemetery of Russian prisoners of war of the First World War solemnly opened in Frankfurt an der Oder. The event was timed to coincide with the 100 anniversary of the end of the war, according to Russkoe Pole. Russian and German volunteers restored the cemetery and also managed to get budget allocation from the local authorities to maintain of the graves. There buried about 600 Russian soldiers and officers.

The restored cemetery opened again on November 17. Dozens of people, Russian compatriots and Germans, came this day to the graves with flowers and memorable wreaths. The mayor of Frankfurt (Oder), as well as representatives of the Russian Embassy in Germany attended the ceremony. Orthodox and Catholic priests performed services. German musicians played classical compositions.

Events dedicated to the 100 anniversary of the end of the First World War in November took place in different countries of Europe and the world. In some states, the anniversary of the end of the war was marked by the restoration of cemeteries and graves, in which the remains of the participants of the First World War and monuments in honor of those events are buried.

Earlier Russkiy Mir reported that Bavaria honored the memory of Russian prisoners of war captured during the First World War. Representatives of Russian-speaking public organizations and local residents attended the ceremony. Russkiy Mir reported Moldova to repair the monument in honor of Russian army soldiers and officers who fell during the First World War.

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