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Anna Karenina ballet: new interpretation of Leo Tolsoy’s novel in the Bolshoi Theatre

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Anna Karenina ballet: new interpretation of Leo Tolsoy’s novel in the Bolshoi Theatre


23.03.2018

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Muscovites will be able to watch the joint staging by the Bolshoi Theatre and Hamburg Ballet today, on March 23. Anna Karenina was staged by the world-famous choreographer Djon Noimaier after the novel by the greatest Russian classical writer. He used music by Tchaikovsky, Schnittke and Stevens. A general rehearsal of the ballet took place the day before the premiere evening, RIA Novosti informs.

Djon Noimaier is well known in Russia. The Seagull after Chekov and Tatiana based on Pushkin’s Eugene Onegin were staged by him in Moscow Musical Theatre after Stanislavsky and Nemirovich – Danchenko. He works in the Bolshoi Theatre for the third time. The repertoire of the Bolshoi Theatre includes his The Midsummer Night’s Dream and the Lady of the Camellias.

German Ambassador to Moscow Rudiger von Fritsch is sure that culture, and art of Noimaier in particular, are a special bridge connecting the two countries. Choreographer, in his turn, has remarked that he feels happy in the country where the art plays a crucial part. He is glad to be a link between Germany and Russia, especially now, when the situation at the international arena is very complicated.
Noimaier said that he thought of staging Anna Karenina after his meeting with ballet dancer Svetlana Zakharova. She danced in his staging the Lady of the Camellias. The dancer herself explained that she was dreaming of playing a part of Anna Karenina and is pretty mature for it.

This ballet staging completes the Russian trilogy of Noimaier, which also includes the Seagull and Tatiana stagings. The choreographer brought Leo Tolsoy’s story from the last but one century into the present circumstances, as Tolstoy wrote about the environment he was surrounded by at that time.

Russkiy Mir 

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