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Latvian Ministry of Education decorated with inscription in Russian: Schools will exist!

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Latvian Ministry of Education decorated with inscription in Russian: Schools will exist!


16.02.2018

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The inscription in the Russian language “Schools will exist!” appeared on the wall of the Latvian Ministry of Education and Science, DELFI informs. A meter-high inscription is visible from the building at Smilshu street and is still on the wall.

This protest is against Latvian administration’s plan to deprive Russian-language community in the country of the opportunity to get education in their native language. According to the plan, after 2019, only Latvian schools will stay in the country. Russian schools will teach only two or three subjects in Russian.

Latvian parliament members declined the petition supporting of the educational curriculum in the Russian language the day before. Around 14 000 people signed the document passed on to the Latvian Parliament.

Russian compatriots have conducted many campaigns in support of education in the Russian language. Activists note that a number of their participants is growing. Besides, The Russian Union of Latvia has made a request for arranging a referendum. In case the authorities decline this request, the organization will send an appeal to the court.

The Parliament Assembly of the European Council stood up for the protection of the Russian-language population. It approved of the resolution on protection of the regional languages and languages of the national minorities in January.

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