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Activists from Poland, Baltics and Russia to discuss protection of Soviet monuments against demolition

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Activists from Poland, Baltics and Russia to discuss protection of Soviet monuments against demolition


16.02.2018

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A round table dedicated to the situation around the Red Army monuments is to take place in the Polish city of Lidzbark Warminski. His participants will discuss preservation of monuments of the territory of Wojewodztwo Warminsko-Mazurskie (Province in the North of Poland), which are going to be pulled down by Warsaw.

Victory Inheritors International Alliance and Kursk society dealing with restoration of monuments in Poland organized the conference.

Russian diplomats, lawyers, right defenders, chairman of Kursk society Jerzy Tyc, Russian compatriots, WWII veterans from Russia and the Baltic States, Polish politicians, local administration, representatives of the Orthodox and Catholic Churches are expected to make a speech at the round table.

Experts, activists of organizations and movements dealing with restoration of the historical memory are invited to take part in the conference.

Note that the first round table took place at the end of last November in a month after the law on demolition of monuments to the Soviet soldiers came into force. It concerns almost 250 memorials. Symbols of the Red Army are also under threat and “should be taken away from the society”. This law concerns the war graves as well. The Hammer and Sickle images and portraits of Josef Stalin will be taken away. At this, the five-pointed star symbolizing the Red Army will remain.

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