Select language:

Slavic New Year celebrated today

 / Главная / Russkiy Mir Foundation / News / Slavic New Year celebrated today

Slavic New Year celebrated today


14.09.2017

u-f.ruSlavic New Year is celebrated today, September 14th (or September 1st by the old calendar) in Russia. It used to be the very important celebration that was was accompanied by a broad range of rituals, reports Calend.ru.

Until the beginning of the 18th century September 1 was the date of the beginning of the New Year in accordance with the Church calendar. In 1700 Peter the Great changed the date of the New Year to January 1 like in most European countries.

Plowmen went around fields singing songs and charms hoping that crop comes good next year. When the fall was approaching all the works in fields were terminated and people started doing work at home (tackle repair, spinning, etc). The eve before the New Year people lighted new torch lights and fire in stove, and started the rite.

The first day of September in Russian Orthodox tradition is called Novoletie (New year) or beginning of the New Indict. Russian Orthodox Church celebrates the feast of The Elevation of the Honorable and Life-giving Cross on September, 14th.

Russkiy Mir

News by subject

Publications

The icebreaker, backpack parachute, tramcar, and foam fire extinguisher—all of these things have long belonged to the list of human achievements. Most people don’t know that they owe their existence to Russian inventors. At the turn of the twentieth century, Russia had one of the strongest schools of inventors in the world, although in many ways it developed in spite of circumstances. We discussed this topic with Tim Skorenko, the author of the book Invented in Russia and editor-in-chief of the Popular Mechanics website.
The idea for the Teacher for Russia program originated with two graduates from Saint Petersburg State University, Alena Makovich and Elena Yarmanova after they came across Teach for All, a major international network of nongovernmental social enterprises. Four years have passed since then, and this year the Russian program celebrated its first graduating class.