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President of the Slovak Republic laid flowers to the Soviet soldiers's monument

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President of the Slovak Republic laid flowers to the Soviet soldiers's monument


09.05.2017

RF Ministry of CultureOn the eve of the Victory Day the memory of Soviet warriors was honored in Slovakia. The head of the country Andrej Kiska and local administration representatives put flowers next to the WW2 monument, the legendary Tank Т-34, TASS reports.

Ambassadors from Russia, Ukraine, and Czech Republic participated in memorial action. World War 2 veteran of the battles for the liberation of Czechoslovakia Nikolay Melnikov was also present. “We greet you on Slovak territory. Thank you for all you've done for us!” delegated Andrej Kiska to the veteran in Russian.

It is planned that later Slovak President will hand medals to Nikolay Melnikov and Vitaliy Rubalko who participated in Bratislava liberation. Another medal will be given later to Alexey Fedorov who stayed in Russia due to his health condition.

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