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Russian writer Alexander Garros dies in Tel Aviv

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Russian writer Alexander Garros dies in Tel Aviv


07.04.2017

Russian writer, screenwriter and journalist Alexander Garros has died in the Ichilov Hospital in Tel Aviv, as per RIA Novosti.

His wife Anna Starobinets advised about her husband’s death on her Facebook account. Alexander Garros had been suffering from cancer for the last two years. He received medical treatment in Germany and had to move to Israel afterwards.

Shortly before his death Anna Starobinets wrote on her Facebook page that doctors regretted to inform that there were not any chances for recovery left, but Garros continued to fight on and chose chemotherapy.

In 2002 together with Alexei Evdokimov, he wrote a debut novel Headcrusher, which was later awarded National Bestseller prize. Alexander Garros was a co-writer of such novels as Truck Factor and Grey Goo.

Farewell ceremony for Alexander Garros and his cremation will take place in Tel Aviv.

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