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Children Removed from Custody of Russian Family in Norway

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Children Removed from Custody of Russian Family in Norway


06.11.2014

Norwegian authorities have taken away two little sons from a Russian man and his third child is under threat of confiscation, according to Irina Bergset, the head of the Russian Mothers organization, TASS reports. “This situation is targeted seizure of children by Norwegian authorities. Parents were permitted to see their sons for two hours twice a year. We pin high hopes on Russia to protect these boys,” Bergset said.

She noted that uncle of these boys Alexander Prikazchikov turned to organization Russian Mothers saying that the Norwegian children rights protection committee had taken away children from a family of his brother who lives in Norway.

“Alexander’s brother Andrey got married to a Norwegian woman in 2002 and three children Nikolay, Sasha and Anton were born in their family several years later,” Bergset said. “Everything was all right until the moment when a Norwegian boy had got an injury from one of Andrey’s sons during a football match at the local school,” Bergset said.

In her words, despite the fact that parents sought to settle this situation the school directorate had made a petition to Norwegian child welfare service Barnevarne. “Some time later parents received a letter that they fail to raise children properly and they need some help,” the movement’s chief said. Meanwhile, “the letter said that during the game with his mother the child has injured his hand,” she said. “Two children are staying in different foster families, but there is a threat that the third child may be confiscated,” Bergset said.

Russkiy Mir Foundation Information Service

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