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Anna Sivkova and Pavel Sukhov Win Medals at World Fencing Championships in Hungary

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Anna Sivkova and Pavel Sukhov Win Medals at World Fencing Championships in Hungary


09.08.2013

Russian fencers won a silver and bronze in the fourth day of competition at the world championship, which is being held in Budapest, ITAR-TASS reports.

Fencer Anna Sivkova narrowly lost in a grueling final to Julia Belyaeva of Estonia with a final score of 14:15. Yana Zvereva, another Russian in the competition, finished eighth.

Among the men, Pavel Sukhov of Russia won a world championship medal for the first time. In the semifinals he lost to 2010 world champion Nikolai Novoselov of Estonia. However, in the fight for third place Sukhov emerged the winner.

Earlier this week Russian fencer Veniamin Reshetnikov won the gold to become world champion.

Russkiy Mir Foundation Information Service

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