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The easy visa to Sochi for EU citizens

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The easy visa to Sochi for EU citizens


19.05.2017

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Sochi authorities want to easy up the visa process for European tourists. The city mayor Anatoly Pakhomov has sent the corresponding request to the Russian Foreign Ministry, RIA Novosti informs.

The Sochi mayor explained that during a meeting with the head of a local touristic agency he was told that many Europeans would prefer to go to Sochi instead of Greece and Turkey, but the complicated and expensive visa process stops them on tracks. Consequentedely, the tour operator asked him to help resolve this situation.

Anatoly Pakhomov has stressed that this problem has to be resolved on the government level, in RF Foreign Ministry. He is sure that once the visa process is not an issue, many EU citizens would gladly come to Russia.

Let us recall that not long ago the visa process for tourists who wished to visit Vladivostok has become much easier as soon as electronic visas were introduced. Besides, with electronic visas tourists can visit Kaliningrad region as well.

As we also mentioned before, Saint Petersburg authorities along with tour operators also propose to introduce electronic visas for foreigners.

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