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Russia’s Baltic Fleet celebrates its anniversary today

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Russia’s Baltic Fleet celebrates its anniversary today


18.05.2017

RF Defense Ministry

The Baltic Fleet celebrates its 314th anniversary since its foundation today, TASS reports. A gala parade will be organized at the main naval base of the Fleet in the north-western city of Baltiysk. The guests of the celebration are welcome to climb on war ships.

Peter the Great founded the Baltic Fleet during the Great Northern War. The birth date of the Fleet is considered 18th of May 1703. At that day, rowing boat fleet with soldiers of Preobrazhensky and Semenovsky regiments under the command of bombard captain Peter Mikhailov – Peter the Great himself and Lieutenant Alexander Menshikov captured two Swedish war ships. The battle happened in the mouth of the Neva River.

Sailors of the Baltic Fleet actively participated in the Revolution of 1917. During WWII, they destroyed more than one thousand two hundred enemy ships and almost two and a half thousand enemy planes. One hundred and seventy three soldiers became the Heroes of the Soviet Union.

Over the years of its existence, the Baltic Fleet was awarded with two Orders of the Red Banner. 

Modern Baltic Fleet is a strategical structure of the Russian Navy at the Baltic Sea. It is a part of Western military district and is a central training facility of the Russian Navy. According to the latest data, the Fleet includes two diesel submarines and fifty-six over water ships.

Russkiy Mir


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