Select language:

Nikonov: It's necessary to provide confidentiality for the educational system

 / Главная / Russkiy Mir Foundation / News / Nikonov: It's necessary to provide confidentiality for the educational system

Nikonov: It's necessary to provide confidentiality for the educational system


24.03.2017

On March 23 Russian State Duma Education and Science Committee held parliament hearings on the topic of Information Support of Educational System.

Present conditions and challenges of the information infrastructure for the educational system including proposals to work out Federal and Regional Systems Student Population were discussed in the course of the hearings.

A number of disconnected educational information systems keeps growing, so there is a strong need to systemize all of them, Chairman of the Education and Science Committee of the State Duma of Russia Vyacheslav Nikonov stated. “The Federal Law on Education implied 5 information systems, however, now there exist around 50 of them. Many systems are not protected from external disturbance, which gives a certain rise to concern”, the deputy underlined. According to Vyacheslav Nikonov, a unified information system Student Population is a rational way out of this situation. Such a system will decrease a number of documents needed for acquiring education services and make the preparation process easier.

The development of a unified information system Student Population will be continued as a part of work for a specialized committee founded by the Russian Federation State Duma in January 2017.

Russkiy Mir 

News by subject

Publications

17 July 1998 was a warm day, abnormally bright for Petersburg. The houses along Moscovsky Avenue let down silk tricolor flags—lowered and joined with ribbonsof mouring. The traffic lights blinked yellow. The avenue, usually lively and filled with cars, was empty; policemen in white gloves stood on ceremonial, one positioned every 50 meters. “What happened?” asked Petersburgers in surprise. “We await the Emperor,” answered the sentries. “Nikolai Romanov.”
Last weekend, Totma—a small town even by the Vologda Region’s standards—marked its 880-year anniversary and celebrated a traditional Russian America Day. The city once prided itself on its salt making and the seafaring merchants who traded in Siberia and America. It was a native of Totma, Ivan Kuskov, who founded Fort Ross in California, and today the town is visited by official delegations from the USA and representatives of indigenous American groups.