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Lavrov proposed Tokyo mutual cooperation projects in Kuril Islands

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Lavrov proposed Tokyo mutual cooperation projects in Kuril Islands


20.03.2017

Flickr/RF Foreign Ministry

Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov held talks with his Japanese counterpart Fumio Kishida today on March 20th in Tokyo, according to the Foreign Ministry Internet Portal.

They exchanged opinions about a wide range of questions regarding bilateral relations and topics of the international agenda. Both parties supported the intention to develop a dialogue to reach a new level of Russia- Japan relations.

Sergey Lavrov stated that Moscow provided Tokyo with proposals of certain cooperation projects on the territory of the Kuril Islands and received some proposals back. Besides, both sides agreed to continue discussions of peace treaty signature in future.

In the course of the negotiations, where Minister of Defence Sergey Shoygu was present too, Russia and Japan coordinated the entry of Japanese training ships into the Russian harbor this year.

It should be reminded that Russian President Vladimir Putin paid an official visit to Japan at the end of last year. Vladimir Putin and Prime Minister Shinzo Abe discussed future perspectives of signing the peace treaty. Vladimir Putin remarked that the meeting with the head of Japanese Parliament Shinzo Abe was an important contribution to reinforcing and development of relations between two countries.

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