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Elena Vesnina wins Russian final of WTA tour at Indian Wells

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Elena Vesnina wins Russian final of WTA tour at Indian Wells


20.03.2017

Flickr/Yann Caradec

Russian tennis player Elena Vesnina became the winner of WTA tour at Indian Wells (known also as BNP Paribas Open), according to TASS.

The most dramaticRussian finallasted for more than three hours and turned out to be the longest one for the whole history of female single competitions. Elena Vesnina won in three sets from another Russian tennis player Svetlana Kuznetsova. The final score was 6:7 (6:8), 7:5, 6:4 in favor of Vesnina.

Experts forecasted the victory of the experienced Kuznetsova who had kept fit since the beginning of this year and had demonstrated consistent quality of playing at the tour. Svetlana Kuznetsova reached Indian Wells Masters final twice, however she failed to win both times.

Elena Vesnina is in perfect shape too. She passed the games very steadily, having won from the titled Venus Williams in quarterfinals.

The Russian players presented local audience of BNP Paribas Openwith a magnificent match where Elena Vesnina appeared to be a bit stronger than her competitor. At first, she was losing 1:4 in the second set and 2:4 in the third set but later she regained scores and reversed the situation.

Russian tennis players had won at Indian Wells Masters three times before. Maria Sharapova managed to achieve the victory in 2006 and 2013, whereas Vera Zvonareva became a winner in 2009.

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