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Flowers of Russia festival to celebrate the fall in Bavaria

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Flowers of Russia festival to celebrate the fall in Bavaria


17.03.2017

pixabay.com The head of RF Ministry of Culture Vladimir Medinsky and Bavarian prime minister Horst Seehofer signed agreement on cultural cooperation. According to the head of federal agency, this document will be an additional incentive in bilateral interaction. Mr Medinsky mentioned that the cultural cooperation is already at the very high level today. The head of Bavarian side marked, in his turn, that political complications will never deter our countries from fostering good relations.

At the beginning of this fall, Flowers of Russia festival will be conducted in Bavarian Capital. Aside of that Imperial Court Magnificence of Romanov House and The Peterhof Palace exposition is planned in Munich. German neoclassicist architect, painter and writer Leo von Klenze will be an inspirational figure for several exhibits in Saint-Petersburg.

As the part of this collaboration, Moscow proposes to conduct an exhibition devoted to Maya Plisetskaya art.

Cooperation between Russian and Bavarian cinematographers also planned; it will include film teachers and students exchange. RF Ministry of Culture that patronizes Russian Military and Historical Society, also proposed the plan on collaborative work on perpetuating the memory of the Soviet heroes who lost their lives on German territory.

Russkiy Mir

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