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Russian society Rodnik celebrates its jubilee in Croatia

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Russian society Rodnik celebrates its jubilee in Croatia


15.03.2017

In March, Russian society Rodnik (the Spring) celebrates 15th anniversary since its foundation in Split, Croatia, World Coordinating Council of Russian Compatriots living abroad informs.

In relation to this date, society activists organized literary musical holiday with participation of local Russophiles and our compatriots. Julia Rehak read poems of famous poets. Kristina Penovich executed author’s and Ukrainian dances.

Ante Gabrich managed background music perfectly well; he made a selection of Russian folk songs and Russian hits. The guests were not left alone and joined dancing with society members. Lusya Relyanovich described society history to the guests and called all Russian literature devotees for continuous active participation in all projects organized by Rodnik. A small quiz was arranged afterwards, three winners were chosen.

Honored guests from the consulate, reporters and representatives of expat communities were present at the meeting. All participants thanked the organizers and agreed that the celebration was a great success.

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