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Orthodox Cathedral to be built in Hungary

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Orthodox Cathedral to be built in Hungary


10.03.2017

©Provided by Hungarian Russian Orthodox Church

Another Cathedral of the Russian Orthodox Church will be erected in Hungary, RIA Novosti informs. Heviz was chosen as a place of its construction.

The corresponding agreement was signed by representatives of the Hungarian Ministry of Human Resources and local eparchy of the Russian Orthodox Church. Moreover, Budapest is going to allocate money for renewal of three orthodox churches. According to this document, Hungarian authorities are donating more than 8 million dollars for this purpose.

Thus, restoration works will be conducted in the Orthodox Uspensky Cathedral of Budapest, in the Cathedral of the Holy Trinity of Miskolc and in St. Nicholas Church of Tokai.

Hungarian Eparchial Bishop Podolsky Tikhon reminded that this major step in relations of Russian Orthodox Church and Hungary has been taken for the first time.

In his opinion, this event is Hungarian people’s contribution into restoration of cathedrals, which are the monuments of national history and culture and into storing Christian traditional values on the European scale.

Russkiy Mir 

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