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Syrian boy participates in campaign for peace held in Artek

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Syrian boy participates in campaign for peace held in Artek


06.01.2017

:  Anna Grigorets, ICC Artek press office A campaign for peace has been held at the international childrens center Artek, reports RIA Novosti. it was arranged as part of new years shift which had a status of an international one. Children from Armenia, Belarus, Kazakhstan, Finland, Greece, China and Serbia, who were the winners of the I Want to Visit Artek contest, had come to Crimea for their winter holidays. The contest had been arranged by the Post of Russia.

Children released white doves up in the sky and made the word peace on the fire ground of the Morskoy camp.

A boy from the capital city of Syria Mufid Al Hamam took part in the campaign along with other children. He was born to a multinational family. His mother comes from Russia and his father comes from Syria. It took the letter written by the boy to get to Russia from Damascus over six months. He said that he liked it in Crimea and he had made a lot of friends in Artek. He thinks that as many children from different countries as possible should come to the childrens center and that will contribute to strengthening of friendship between different nations

The boy had brought a handmade panel depicting an Arabic yard. He said that there had been plenty of them in his country before the war but they have been destroyed by it now.

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