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Victory Day and Katusha performed at Rotterdam railway station

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Victory Day and Katusha performed at Rotterdam railway station


09.01.2017

Photo: Flickr/Michel Curi
On Sunday, twenty Russian compatriots living in the Netherlands sang a number of popular Soviet songs, including Victory Day, Katusha and Moscow Nights at the city railway station, reports TASS.

According t the arrangers of the campaign, its purpose is to illustrate the fact that Russian compatriots living in different countries share “interests, songs, and culture” and they have “nothing to divide and have no reasons to fall out”.

The idea to perform Soviet, Russian and Ukrainian songs was initiated by Ukrainian residents last autumn. Odessa, Kharkov and Zaporozhye residents sang songs from Soviet films. Random passers-by joined in the flash mob held at the Kiev railway station. They sang the songs and after the event was over they chanted the slogan “We stand for peace, peace to the world”.

The campaign has a hashtag #мыжиливоднойстране (‘We used to live in the same country”). In December 2016, the same type of flashmob was held at the railway station in Amsterdam. Songs were also performed by the flashmob participants in Russia, America, Canada, Moldova and a number of European countries.

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