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Historic 18th Century Shipyard to Be Moved out of St. Petersburg

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Historic 18th Century Shipyard to Be Moved out of St. Petersburg


18.06.2010

The Admiralty Shipyard, where the first Russian Navy ships were built at the beginning of the 18th century, will be moved from St. Petersburg to the island city of Kronshtadt in the Gulf of Finland, the head of Russia's United Shipbuilding Corporation said on Thursday, RIA Novosti reports.

The Admiralty Shipyard, one of the oldest and largest in Russia, was opened in 1705, two years after Peter the Great founded his new capital on the Neva River. Peter, who became the first Russian emperor in 1721, received training in Holland as a shipbuilder and made the creation of a powerful navy and commercial fleet part of his drive to integrate Russia into Europe.

The Admiralty Shipyard company, the United Shipbuilding Corporation and the St. Petersburg government signed an agreement to relocate the shipyard on the sidelines of the International Economic Forum, which started in St. Petersburg on Thursday.

"We are planning to conclude the relocation in eight years, but probably we will manage earlier - in six years," Roman Trotsenko said.

He said the Admiralty Shipyard was "100% loaded" with contracts, but was using obsolete shipbuilding technologies. The relocation will allow to modernize the company, Trotsenko said.

The Admiralty Shipyard will be relocated to a new dockyard to be built in Kronshtadt, the governor said. Offices and residential houses will be built in the 17-hectare area, where the shipyard is currently located, she said.

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